Category: Automotive

How to Change a Tire on Your Own

Automotive

There might be a time in your life where you will have to change the tyre of your car. Many people are unable to do this task because they were never taught how to. Here is a simplified tutorial on how to change the ty safely and efficiently.

Before you do anything you need to make sure that you have all the necessary tools. This list includes a lug wrench or tire iron, a jack, an inflated tyre and the manual as the manufacturers may have specific instructions.

Upon realizing that you have a flat tyre you must drive extremely carefully. Do not suddenly brake or turn as it could damage your wheels. Slowly reduce the speed and park in a place where you are safe and off the road.

Once you have stopped in a safe location engage the handbrake to prevent the car from moving while you are changing the tyre. It's also important to engage the handbrake as you need the wheel to be still.

It would be wise to put bricks or wedges behind and in front of the tires that do not need to be changed so that your car is safely static in one place.

Now you can remove the hubcap so that the lug nuts are exposed for removal. The hubcap can be removed with the ty iron by using the flat part. There is a clip on it that should not be too difficult to remove.

When placing the jack under the car, the best place to put it would be as close to the flat tire as possible, along the edge of the body of the car. Your car has to be fifteen centimetres off the ground. You can now remove the lug nuts.

To remove the lug nuts, use the wrench with the correct fitment and turn counter-clockwise. When dealing with any screws, bottle caps, water taps keep the following rule in mind: "lefty-loosey, righty tighty". Turn left to loosen the screw and right to tighten the screw. At this point you do not need to completely remove the lug nuts. You can remove the ty by pulling it towards you gently until it disengages from the wheel axle.

The dirty part is now completed and it's time to put a new and air-filled tyre onto your car. Align the tire with the wheel and the lug bolts so that they fit together properly. Place the nuts back on and tighten them as much as you can. Tighten them with the wrench once the car has been lowered back onto the ground. Finally you can put the hubcap back on the same way you took it off.

Before any of this occurs, ensure that a wheel supplier is able to give you a wheel that is similar to what you have. So when you get a punctured tire, you will have a spare tire that looks the same as the others.

It's important to have general knowledge of your car so that if you encounter a problem you can fix it or handle it yourself.

Source by Morne Lourens

What Is the Difference Between a Sports Car and a Roadster?

Automotive

Have you ever looked at a car and thought maybe that could be a sports car because it only has two seats? It’s elegant like a sports car and as agile as a sports car, but there is a difference between the two. Here is the difference between the roadster and the sports car.

The first car that was made is considered a roadster as it only has two seats installed and no roof. They also call convertible cars roadsters because of the convertible roof. Examples would include the Porsche Boxster and the Aston Martin V8 Vantage Roadster.

A roadster is often considered a sports car as it was made to emphasise the comfort and the handling of the vehicle. However, this was considered a sports car when the fastest car only had two to four cylinders and not a lot of horsepower. A roadster, now, can be just as fast as the BMW M3 but it’s not as warm in the winter months though.

Sports cars are defined by the type of engine they have. The engine usually has to consist of eight cylinders or more to be considered a sports car or super car. Obviously the suspension and turbochargers are part of it but it’s mainly how many cylinders it contains. The car should be able to go from a stationary position to one hundred kilometres per hour in just a couple of seconds; nothing a roadster can’t handle.

Sports cars nowadays are front-engine and front wheel drive vehicles. There are few manufacturers who have rear-engines and rear wheel drive ability such as Porsche and the Audi R8. The layout has been changed because the performance of giving the car torque from the front is better and faster without requiring as much force to push the car.

Unlike the roadster, engineers and manufacturers have tried to make the sports car more practical in case a child or luggage was to be involved with the traveling. They call the four seating layout “2+2”, which means that there the two occasional seats with the general driver and shotgun seats.

Both cars require specific types of wheels and tyres to ensure their optimum driving force. So the wheel suppliers take this into account when designing the vehicles. The wheels must be able to handle high speeds and tight corners.

These types of cars are so similar yet so different especially to the hard-core vehicle enthusiasts. Yet to a normal person, both could serve the same purposes just as well. One could be your holiday car for those hot days and the other could be your super elegant and fast family car.

Source by Morne Lourens

Auto Body Dent Repair – Developing A Repair Plan

Automotive

Developing A Repair Plan
In this article we are going to review how to remove a dent from an automotive part. We've determined that the panel is mild steel and repairing the damage would be a better choice than to replace the panel. Now we need to develop a repair plan and decide which repair method to use on the damage.

First In Last Out
The first thing that you want to determine is the direction of damage. This is important so you can reverse the damage during repairs. In collision repair we have a general rule "the first in last out rule." This means that the direct damage or point on impact is the area first hit in an accident, which makes it the first in. Therefore, this should be that last area to repair. Direct damage is the most obvious damage as it is easy to visually see. If you try to pull the direct damage first, you will stretch the metal, pull highs in the metal, and still have lows. You are basically going to chase your damage around while working hardening the metal until the metal became to work hardened, brittle and cracks.

Direct and Indirect Damage
Indirect damage is the damage that is caused by the direct damage. For example, as the point of impact is pushed in, it causes the surrounding metal to slightly move as well. If pushed far enough, the indirect damage can cause misaligned body gaps, cracked seam sealer, and / or popped spot welds. The indirect damage is less noticeable as it may not be visibly noticeably without close observation. The indirect damage is the damage the occurred last during the accident, therefore, this damage should be repaired first. Always remember the "first in last out" rule when developing a repair plan. This will save you hours of time and frustration when it is all done.

Choosing a Repair Method
Once the damage is analyzed and you have determined the direction of damage, and the direct and indirect damage. Now it is time to decide which repair method is the best choice for the repair. If you can get to both sides of the panel a hammer and dolly method may be the easiest repair method. If you can not gain access to both sides of the panel a stud-nail gun may be a better choice. Other considerations, such as corrosion protection and noise preventions should be considered as well. This will be covered at a later time.

Do not Force The Metal, But Rather Roll The Metal Back To Its Shape
Regardless of the repair method, the same principle apply. Start with the indirect damage and pull out on the lows and push in on the highs. You should roll the metal back into shape, rather than try to force it back into shape. Forcing the metal back into its shape may result in highs and stretched metal. Condition. Pulling on the lows while rolling the highs out of the metal is the key to metal straightening, regardless of repair method used.

Source by Donnie A Smith

Tinting Your Car Windows to Protect Your Leather Seats

Automotive

Having window tint professionally installed onto your vehicle will provide you with a stylish and sleek look. But having your car windows tinted will also serve a more useful purpose: protecting the interior of your vehicle. This is especially beneficial if your car has leather seats. Leather will eventually become brittle and crack if it is exposed to sunlight for too long. Protecting your car’s interior with tinted windows can significantly prolong the life of your leather upholstery and trim, which will improve the resale value of the vehicle.

Leather seats are abundant in luxury cars and SUVs. These vehicles cost a lot of money, so it would be wise to protect your investment by shielding the interior of your vehicle from harmful UV rays. UV rays will not only cause the leather to dry out and crack, but it can also fade the color of your interior, including carpeting, fabrics and plastic trim.

Without tinted car windows, you and your passengers risk being burned by the super-heated leather seats on a hot day. Everyone has entered a vehicle after it had been sitting in the sun for a while. Prolonged exposure to sunlight can cause the leather interior to become so hot that it can actually cause severe burns to the driver or passengers. When your vehicle windows are professionally tinted, your interior will have protection from direct sunlight and the leather will not be able to reach such a dangerous temperature.

Furthermore, tinted windows can protect your vehicle by warding off break-ins. Criminals will not want to break into a vehicle if they can’t see what’s inside. While you should never leave valuables in your car, having tinted windows will provide the necessary privacy you need for your belongings. Thieves will be deterred from breaking into your car simply because they can’t see through the window tinting.

You should always hire a professional window tinting company to install your window tints. They have the equipment to do the job correctly and have years of experience installing window tint on all types of vehicles. The do-it-yourself kits should be avoided – especially if you have no experience installing window tints – because often times they result in air bubbles and a tint that will only last a few years.

Every state has laws regulating the tint darkness grade allowable. Bring your vehicle to a reputable automotive tinting shop and they will be able to offer your window tinting solutions that are within the boundaries of your state’s laws.

Protect your vehicle and your leather interior with professional automotive window tinting. You can keep your car private, cool and shielded from dangerous UV rays – all while giving your vehicle a classic and sleek look.

Source by Budda Oliver

A Secret Credit Score Your Car Dealer Will not Tell You About

Automotive

You're ready to buy a new car.

You've done all your homework.

You know your three FICO credit scores.

You determine that your highest FICO credit score is from Equifax (also known as your BEACON score).

So, you find a car dealer who uses your highest score (which increases your opportunity to get approved at a good rate).

You get to the dealership and ignore all the salespeople by going directly to the finance director's office.

But as the finance director reviews your credit file in front of you … you can not help but think something is wrong.

Sure enough … the dealer says your Equifax / BEACON score is not high enough for their lowest interest rate.

How can this be? You just checked your FICO credit scores through http://www.myfico.com/12 a few hours ago. It's possible – although illegally – the information on your credit report has changed and that your scores have declined since you last checked them. Remember, your credit scores are dynamic and will change whenever information on your credit reports changes.

Your credit reports can change several times each month as new information is added or updated by your lenders. But more than likely, your scores would not change in this situation (especially if there were only a few hours between when you checked your scores and when the dealership reviewed your credit reports).

So, if your credit reports did not change, why is the finance director staring at your scores with such a discouraging face?

Car Dealers Can Use "Different" FICO Scores Than The Ones You See

The car dealer is probably using what is known as the FICO Auto Industry Option score instead of a traditional FICO credit score. You see, car dealers not only get to select the credit reporting agency they receive FICO credit scores from … they also get to decide if they will use a traditional FICO credit score or a variation of a FICO score called an Auto Industry Option score .

What's the difference between these two types of scores?

Not a whole lot to most people … but there's enough variation to make the major of auto lenders use the Auto Industry Option score. The real difference between the two scores is that the Auto Industry Option score pays a lot more attention to how you handled previous auto credit.

– Have you made late payments on a current or previous auto loan or lease?
– Have you ever settled an auto loan or lease for less than you owed?
– Have you had a car repossessed?
– Have you had an auto account sent to collections?
– Did you include your car loan or lease in your bankruptcy?

Those actions will affect your Auto Industry Option score more than they'll affect your traditional FICO score. Bottom line, if you handled your previous auto credit perfectly, you should have a high FICO Auto Industry Option score – that's a good thing.

But what if you've had a few bumps in the auto credit road in the past? You guessed it … your Auto Industry Option score will be lower. You'll be perceived as a greater credit risk and the auto lender may either deny you or use your lower score to justify charging you a higher interest rate.

You see, auto lenders are different than other types of lenders. And I'm not talking about their slimy ways, leisure suits, short ties, manly hairy chests, or gold bling.

A lot of other lenders look at your whole credit picture to determine whether or not to give you a loan. But many auto lenders care about only one thing … how you handled your past AUTO credit. That's what a FICO Auto Industry Option Score gives car dealers – a way to pinpoint how you've handled what matters to them the most.

So, even if everything else on your credit reports went down the toilet after your bankruptcy, if you did not include your auto loan in your bankruptcy and never defaulted or missed a car payment, your Auto Industry scores will probably be better than your traditional FICO scores!

What a Former Auto Finance Director Revealed to Me

I recently spoke with a former finance director, and this is what she told me …

"So many people I had helped could not believe their scores were so high with the FICO Auto Industry Option score. Auto score is that it really helps the auto lender concentrate on what is important – how the customer handles his / her auto loans.

By our dealership having the auto enhanced FICO, it helped 30% or more of our customers get better rates. "

I do not believe I'm going to say this, but I think I may actually have something good to say about car dealers! Well, some of them, anyway …

As you can see, the FICO auto scores can work in your favor, if they are used correctly.

OK, I just would not be able to live with myself if I only said good things about car dealers.

So, in the interest of fair and balanced reporting, here's how to protect yourself against slimy car dealers that can use your FICO Auto Industry Option
Scores against you …

A Dirty Trick Car Dealers Can Play with Your FICO Scores

Let's imagine your Equifax / Beacon FICO score is 585. Not too good. With a score that low, if you do get approved for a car loan, you'll probably wind up with a high interest rate and high monthly payment.

So you go to a dealership and talk with the finance director and tell him your Equifax FICO score is 585. The finance director then reviews your FICO Auto Industry Option score. And, unknown to you, this score is actually higher than the Equifax / Beacon FICO score you dropped.

With this higher score, you'll get approved at a better rate … right?

Not necessarily!

Here's what unscrupulous car dealers can do. They will not tell you that your auto score is higher than your traditional score!

They figure they have a sucker sitting in front of them. So they'll try to get you funded at a higher rate based on the lower FICO score (thus making more profit for themselves).

How Some Car Dealers "Play the Spread" to Get You to Pay More

Now check this out …

It's possible that a car dealer has the ability to pull your traditional FICO scores AND your FICO auto scores. That means they'll have six scores on you. It's a guarantee that some of those scores are going to be higher than the others. So which ones will they use when trying to get you funded?

It depends.

Are you familiar with the term "spread"? It's how car dealers make money when they finance you. If they can quote you a higher interest rate than you deserve – then they stand to make a nice chunk of change from the bank that finances you.

The only way to make a killer "spread" is to make you think that you have lower scores.

So, what can you do?

Do not despair … I can help you.

How to Use Your FICO Scores to Your Advantage when Buying a Car

Fortunately, you do not have to fall for their dirty tricks. Now that you know all about FICO Auto Industry Option scores, you can protect yourself. Here's what I suggest …

1. When you first walk into the finance director's office, do not tell him what your FICO scores are. Wait until he reviews the scores himself. Then ask him what your scores are.

2. If the scores he reviewed are higher than the ones you have, do not say anything and just go by his scores.

3. However, if your scores are higher, then pull them out and show him. If he has a choice in the type of scores he can use, there's a possibility that he'll be able to use your highest score. And, it will let him know that he does not have a fool sitting in front of him. He can not take advantage of you!

How do you find out what your FICO Auto Industry Option scores are before you walk into a car dealership?

You can not.

Sorry. They're not for sale – at any price. Only lenders have access to them.

FICO would like to sell them … but there just is not enough demand. I mean seriously, up until you read this article, had you ever heard of the FICO Auto Industry Option score?

Exactly.

Remember, we were just given access to purchase all three of our traditional FICO credit scores on June 11, 2003 at 8:00 am (I actually got misty that day … what a geek I am.)

Only a very small percentage of the population even knows they have three FICO credit scores … let alone three Auto Industry Option scores.

So How Can You Use This Information to Help You Get Your Next New Car Financed at the Best Interest Rate

1. First, get your three credit reports. If you handled your previous auto credit well – your FICO Auto Industry Option scores will be higher than your traditional FICO scores. So expect more from the lender.

2. You can also ask the lender to show you their tier levels. Tiers are basically charts lenders use that have different interest rates based on your scores. You want to see which tier your fall in. To see an example of an auto lender's tier schedule, click here.

3. If they will not show you … at least have them break it down verbally for you. (Personally, I like to see it with my own eyes, as I never believe a word that comes out of most car dealers' mouths.)

4. If you've handled your auto credit poorly … then you should simply try to find an auto lender that uses just the traditional FICO credit scores. When you find a lender that uses a traditional FICO credit score, you'll have your best chance to get the lowest interest rate.

5. Start by calling dealerships and asking the finance director if they use a traditional FICO credit score to make their lending decision or if they use the FICO Auto Industry Option score.

These steps will get you headed in the right direction. This will not be easy, as a lot of car dealers use the FICO Auto Industry Option score.

Source by Stephen Snyder

The Benefits of a Hand Car Wash

Automotive

Our cars are more than just a way for us to get from point A to point B. They are an essential part of our lives. Our cars reflect our personalities and interests. We choose our gasoline based on which brand will help extend the life of the engine. We buy seat covers to protect the upholstery, and sun shades to protect the dashboard. Some people even name their cars. But despite the obvious attachment we have to our vehicles, all too often people neglect the important task of keeping their cars clean.

You might be one of the many people who are in the habit of washing your car at home. Think twice before hauling out the sponge and bucket again. Hand washing, done improperly, can damage your car’s exterior. The grit and dirt clinging to the paint can easily cause scratches. The wrong sort of sponge or soap can also cause damage, or dull the color. Over time, the grime that builds up can even cause corrosion. While this may seem like merely an aesthetic problem, a car with a lackluster exterior will have a depreciated resale value later on. Given how much expense you’ve put into keeping your car running smoothly, doesn’t it make sense to further protect your investment?

Getting your car washed professionally isn’t just good for your car – it’s good for the environment, too. On average, a professional car wash uses about half as much water as it takes to wash your car at home. That means a lower water bill for you, and a lower impact on the planet.

So why choose a hand wash over an automatic wash? The benefit lies in the attention to detail. Nothing gets things cleaner than a person working on a car with their own two hands. Additionally, some of the circular brushes and scrubbers used by automatic washes can be abrasive over time. A good hand wash is gentle enough to protect your paint, and ensures that from headlights to bumper, your car comes back to sparkling.

Source by R. M. Chambers

Motor Oil Analysis Testing on the Cheap – The Blotter Spot Test

Automotive

It is often difficult to know for certain just how long your oil could last before needing a change. The type of car you drive, the size of the engine, the age of the engine, the type of driving that you do and the type of oil that is in your crankcase will ALL have a significant effect on oil longevity.

Of course, quick lubes will continue to tell you that 3,000 mile changes are a necessity, and, for SOME people, this may be true. However, for the vast majority of us, this hasn’t been necessary for a good many years. Unfortunately, determining just HOW LONG is OK can be difficult.

Enter Oil Analysis

The best way to establish realistic oil change intervals is via oil analysis. Those who have been professionally trained to test oil and who have expensive lab equipment at their disposal are certain most qualified to determine the quality of the used oil sitting in your vehicle.

Such a thorough analysis of your oil can be cost prohibitive, though, since a professional oil analysis can often cost as much as a 5 quart petroleum oil change.

The Result – We Don’t Do It

Of course, the result is that most folks won’t pay for a “true” oil analysis – but they might be willing to perform a simple oil analysis themselves, if they knew how to do it. It won’t give you detailed numbers as you’d get from a lab, but it can give you a fairly good idea of how well your oil is holding up, thus helping you decide whether it’s time to make a change or not.

Below you’ll find detailed instructions for 1 of 6 layman’s oil analysis tests that you can use to determine how well your oil is holding up and whether it’s ready for a change. In this way you can begin to set realistic oil change intervals for your vehicle.

Performing the Test

Using just this simple layman’s oil analysis test can shed light on a wide range of potential oil problems which could require an oil change: excessive particulates, condensation build-up, glycol contamination, fuel dilution, failure of dispersant additives, formation of sludge and oxidation products. It is probably one of the most useful DIY oil analysis tests you can perform, and it’s drop dead simple.

While your engine (and the oil) is WARM (not HOT), allow a drop of oil to fall from your dipstick onto a heavy, white, NON-glossy business card. Lay the paper or business card flat, but so that all but the very edges of the paper is suspended. As a possible example, if you’re using stiff card stock or a stiff business card (which you really should be) simply set the card across the top of a cup or mug of some sort.

You want to wait for the paper or card to absorb the oil drop completely which might take awhile. The list of characteristics below should help you evaluate the condition of your oil based on the DRY oil spot.

  • If your oil is still good for continued use, the dry oil spot will be uniform in color without any especially dark areas or rings. There may be a slightly yellow outer ring.
  • If your dispersant additives are failing, you’ll likely see a very dense and quite dark area, normally within the center of the circle. Consider changing your oil soon, especially if any other issues come up in the course of “testing”.
  • Glycol (antifreeze) in your oil? Expect to see a very black and somewhat “pasty” zone within the oil spot. Change your oil very soon.
  • If the circle is really dark throughout and has a very distinct outer ring, your oil is severely oxidized and needs to be changed immediately.
  • If the center of the circle is quite dark and there are outer rings you may likely have fuel in your oil. This does not necessarily mean that you need to change your oil since it is common to have fuel in your oil, but it could if the level is too high. Only a professional analysis will tell you how high those levels are.

Source by Michael Kaufman

What Is the Difference Between Hubcaps and Wheel Covers?

Automotive

Can You Tell the Difference Between Hubcaps and Wheel Covers?

When you drive through the streets of your city, you’re bound to see vehicles with steel wheels, banged-up alloy rims, and busted plastic hubcaps. Your first impression? It’s always, “Wow, that’s ugly!” But if there’s a chance that someone’s saying that about your car, you should probably do something about it.

If you’re shopping for a solution for your boring wheels, you’ve seen the terms ‘hubcaps’ and ‘wheel covers’. What is the difference, and which one is right for you?

What Are Hubcaps?

Hubcaps aren’t actually what you think they are. Hubcaps are a component on older vehicles and some heavy-duty trucks that serves a small yet important purpose. It’s a small cup that fits tightly over a wheel hub – the area where the wheel bearing resides. It seals out dirt and moisture and holds in grease to keep all the delicate moving parts well lubricated.

Hubcaps are anything but pretty. In fact, most often they’re corroded, dented, and dull. Since hubcaps are smacked in place with a hammer, then pried off occasionally, they live a life of abuse. Because wheel hubs are most commonly a sealed assembly these days, hubcaps are no longer found on your everyday vehicle.

Alright, so it’s splitting hairs; a matter of semantics. But if the part you’re looking for isn’t called a hubcap, what is it? Maybe wheel covers?

What are Wheel Covers?

For a classy, dressed-up look for your wheels, there are a few choices.

You can opt for expensive painted, chrome, or alloy wheels. There are a ton of styles available so you can choose one that suits your style. The problem is that aftermarket wheels corrode easily and can be easily damaged. You could put out big bucks just keeping your wheels looking good.

You can choose wheel skins. These fit directly over your factory wheels and look just like the factory wheel. If you’re looking for the factory design, specific to your vehicle brand and model, this is the perfect choice. You just need to make sure that it’s the right design for the wheels you have, otherwise the wheel skins you buy aren’t going to fit.

Wheel covers, on the other hand, are another option. Wheel covers can be brand-specific or custom-fit. They can be chrome, silver, or painted your favorite color. Wheel covers are easily maintained, durable, and flexible.

Wheel covers are your best choice for customizing your car inexpensively. You aren’t locked into just one design or color, and there’s a hubcap – scratch that – wheel cover pattern you’re sure to love.

Have you accidentally rubbed the curb and cracked or scuffed your wheel cover? No problem! A new set of wheel covers costs a fraction of a single replacement alloy wheel. Have your tastes changed? Easy! You can pick a new wheel cover design and change your car’s look in just a few minutes.

Wheel covers are available in virtually every wheel size on the market. Many aftermarket wheel covers are a universal fit, dependent only on your personal taste. Or, if you’ve lost a factory-installed wheel cover, you can get an individual exact replacement.

Source by Rick Dynek

The Difference Between Anti-Lock Brakes and Standard Brakes

Automotive

An Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS) is a type of breaking system that prevents your tires from locking up, when placed under heavy load. When jamming on the break, the break pad will typically grip the rotors too hard, locking up and making it difficult to maneuver. Anti-Lock brakes will pulse, keeping the pads from locking onto the rotors, thus enabling the driver to maintain a level of control.

Traditional brakes do not have the ability to pulse and instead of lock into the rotors. This inhibits the ability to steer the vehicle, since when the tires aren’t rotating sliding straight is the only option. ABS is considered optional safety equipment, but comes standard on most newer vehicles.

Traction Control

Traction control is an option sold along with vehicles equipped with anti-lock brakes. This system helps tires keep traction on the ground during hard acceleration or turning. Traction control almost always works with a vehicles ABS and would not be included on vehicles with standard brakes. Some of the newest technology in anti-lock brake systems allows for detection of slippage, then controls the throttle and braking simultaneously.

Anti-Lock Brakes As Safety Equipment

Previously we discussed how anti-lock brakes can help keep the driver in control of braking vehicle. Well, there have been numerous tests done on how anti-lock brakes can improve the safety of passengers, one of the latest studies was by Monash University Accident Research Center. They found that Anti-Lock Brake Systems reduced the chance of multi-car accidents by 18% and Run-Off-Road accidents by as much as 35%.

Conclusion

So, when buying that next car, whether new or used, consider the added value of a vehicle with an Anti-Lock Brake System. The difference between an ABS and traditional brake systems makes the up charge worth every penny.

Source by Christopher Davidson

What Is Considered A Junk Car?

Automotive

The term is thrown around quite often, you hear it all the time in conversations or in anger for times when a car is not performing as well as it should, but what is actually considered a junk car? Many people picture an orange rusty old little car sitting on a lawn or in the driveway, I mean that was the first thing that used to come to my mind before I became so fondly familiar with this field. It never occurred to me that anything beyond that mental picture could be called, and let alone considered a junk car. Just some old parted out “thing” that had no purpose for anyone whatsoever, see I still can’t get that image out of my head, but in many peoples eyes a car can be considered junk because of numerous different reasons or conditions.

Besides the image ingrained in my mind from way, way back when, a car that simply doesn’t run anymore is considered junk by many as well. You could probably just imagine a person kicking the tire of their car because it just stopped working in the middle of a highway. It’s the car on the side of the road because the transmission started grinding and just broke down, or the radiator just blew because something caused the car to overheat, or the car in the driveway for some odd reason that just doesn’t seem to want to start. Also cars that have been in accidents can be considered junk cars too, especially when they appear to be beyond repair.

Generally, any car that has little or no value to its owner is considered a junk car. Whether the car won’t run, got wrecked in an accident, or the cost to fix a broken down car exceeds the owners perceived value of the car, it is considered to be a junk or salvage car. Besides peoples perceptions, many states have the power the declare a car junk, salvaged, rebuilt, etc as well. Normally this happens after a car has been in an accident and was sold by an insurance company to a dealer because the total amount of damage and cost for repairs exceeded 75% of the current value of the vehicle. Most people don’t know this, but when a car is bought from insurance companies it is considered totaled, and most if not all states will be declared junk and be branded with a junked, salvage, or rebuilt title, and to get a car with this type of title registered in many states requires a separate anti-theft inspection on top of all other state requirements which is not a fun task at all.

I hope you found this article useful and have discovered how many people, businesses, and even states can perceive a vehicle as being junk, salvaged, or rebuilt.

Source by Mike Frantel